SoloPoint Insights

How to Follow Up During the Application Process (without being too pushy)

You’ve just gone through the application and interview process and thought it went pretty well. Now, the least favorite part of anyone’s job search: waiting to hear if you’ve gotten the position. While most employers move pretty quickly, you will run into a few that move more like molasses.

So, how can you follow-up without being too annoying or pushy? It’s a fine art! Here are some tips to help you stay in touch with a potential employer, without coming on too strong.

Ask Before You Leave

The first step is one you’ll want to take before you ever leave the interview. Ask them about the process and when they think they’ll have a decision. Make a note of this and set a follow-up about a week after the date they give you. If they’re unsure, you’ll need to schedule a date to follow-up with them in around two to three weeks.

The Art of the Immediate Follow-Up

Sending a thank you letter is essential after a job interview. Not only will it help you stand out from the rest of the crowd, it also shows an employer that you are serious, professional and willing to go the extra mile. If you’re applying for a sales position, this is even more important.

Your thank you should be sent right away after your job interview. It’s perfectly fine to email your thank you over, but you’ll get extra bonus points if you take the time to mail an actual thank you.

Your Last Stand

So, it’s been awhile and you still haven’t heard anything. While there are a few schools of thoughts on how often you should follow up, most professionals agree that once is enough. Don’t squander this last chance at checking in!

Ideally, you’ll want to wait a maximum of four weeks following your application or interview to do your last check-in. It can be via email or by phone, whichever you prefer. Remember, you only get this one shot, so be professional, and avoid using any potentially pushy phrases.

The only time you’d want to go over one more contact would be if the hiring manager asks you to follow-up with them again, in the event that a decision has not yet been reached.

Want help finding the perfect job? SoloPoint Solutions is here to help!

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